Adventures in Social Sciences Blog

(formerly Adventures in HDFS)

Get Rejected on a Regular Basis

As an interdisciplinary researcher and family demographer, I have been frustrated by the lack of data to answer some of what I believe are the more important research questions. As a tenure-track faculty member at a research intensive university, my (federal) grantsmanship expectations are high if I want to get promoted to full, or toContinue reading “Get Rejected on a Regular Basis”

How to Succeed in College

Dear students, The science of learning has identified many study strategies that can increase retention and comprehension, yet most college professors rarely talk about these strategies. Below I cover four topics: efficient study skills, accountability structures, distraction blockers, and additional tips. If you apply these strategies to every college course you take, and your lifeContinue reading “How to Succeed in College”

Accountability Group

As many of my readers know, and for that matter, anyone who talks to me knows, I am an avid consumer of productivity tips, from blog posts to books. As the mother of four boys ages 5 to 15, married to a full-time employed co-parent, I am super busy all the time. And, I alsoContinue reading “Accountability Group”

Active Learning Activity: The Motherhood Penalty, at Work and Home

My absolutely favorite assignment every semester is the “family science meme” assignment. I have them make a meme related to our class, and write a short paragraph explaining it. This assignment really helps me understand what stood out to them during the semester, plus the memes are really funny. I noticed last semester that moreContinue reading “Active Learning Activity: The Motherhood Penalty, at Work and Home”

Work Hard, Play Harder, and Be Gentle with Yourself: Advice for the Beginning of Grad School and Beyond

I have a lot of thoughts on my mind as I wrap up my prosem on graduate education. I have spent a semester talking to young, hopeful, bright first-year graduate students about how to be successful in graduate school. I have also been supporting several students this semester who are currently on the job marketContinue reading “Work Hard, Play Harder, and Be Gentle with Yourself: Advice for the Beginning of Grad School and Beyond”

Fighting Back: Implicit Bias, Micro-aggressions, and Micro-resistance

I have been planning to do a post on diversity in graduate education, but it requires me being vulnerable and I wasn’t even sure how to even do it. On Tuesday, in my first-year graduate proseminar, we had a session on implicit bias, micro-aggressions, and micro-resistance, and ironically, 2016 was the first year that IContinue reading “Fighting Back: Implicit Bias, Micro-aggressions, and Micro-resistance”

A Publishing Primer

One irritating thing about starting anything new, whether it is grad school or a job, is all of the jargon that no one seems to like to explain. So, in this post I  explain what publications are, and the publication process. What Academics Mean When They Talk About Publications A publication generally refers to aContinue reading “A Publishing Primer”

Advice on Being Advised

The advisor-advisee relationship can be complicated. This post focuses on advice for new grad students on how to navigate these relationships and start off on the right foot. However, these relationships vary on so many continuums – on how friendly they are, how hierarchical they are, how useful they are. . . Thus, some ofContinue reading “Advice on Being Advised”

Professional Organizations: Why You Should Join Them, How to Get the Most Out of Their Meetings, and How to Avoid Going Broke Doing So

Professional organizations and their meetings are one of the best parts of academic life. You get access to important professional resources and networks. Conferences are in fun locations – some of my favorites have been Melbourne, San Diego, New Orleans, Lausanne – and once there, you get to hang out with a bunch of peopleContinue reading “Professional Organizations: Why You Should Join Them, How to Get the Most Out of Their Meetings, and How to Avoid Going Broke Doing So”

Dual-earner couples share the housework equally – until the first baby comes

Claire Kamp Dush, The Ohio State University As a tenured professor and mother of four young sons, I am constantly asked, “How do you do it?” What people mean is: “How can you have a full-time job and still manage child care and housework?” I usually respond, “High-quality husband and high-quality child care, in thatContinue reading “Dual-earner couples share the housework equally – until the first baby comes”

Do I have an effect? Definitions, Examples, and an Infographic on Causal Language

Causal language is a term that gets thrown around often in peer reviews because causal language irritates many seasoned reviewers. I knew when I started these posts on causal analysis, that I wanted to write something on causal language. I googled causal language and looked at what came up – and I could not findContinue reading “Do I have an effect? Definitions, Examples, and an Infographic on Causal Language”

Why I believe in Family Science

Today I am publishing the first publicly available ranking of Human Development and Family Science programs in North America, at least the first ranking that I am familiar with.  Why did I go to the trouble of creating this ranking? Because I believe in human development, and in particular, family science, and you should too.Continue reading “Why I believe in Family Science”

Guest Post: Leadership Matters, So what’s the Matter with our Leadership Today?

I was recently having coffee with my friend and colleague Dean and Professor Steve Gavazzi to discuss the National Council on Family Relation‘s Future of Family Science task force [more on that in a future post] and I mentioned my series of blog posts on self-regulated learning and graduate education. Steve asked me – didContinue reading “Guest Post: Leadership Matters, So what’s the Matter with our Leadership Today?”

Self-regulated Learning and Graduate Education: What Graduate Programs Should do Part 2

Well, it is time for my final post in my series on self-regulated learning and graduate education. This series resulted in the following posts: Motivation, Self-Regulated Learning, and Graduate Education Information to Promote Grad Student Success Tools to Promote Grad Student Success: Writing Skills Tools to Promote Grad Student Success: Research Skills Tools to PromoteContinue reading “Self-regulated Learning and Graduate Education: What Graduate Programs Should do Part 2”

Self-regulated Learning and Graduate Education: What Graduate Programs Should do Part 1

Today I want to wrap up my series on self-regulated learning and graduate education. I want to revisit my original question: “What information, tools, tasks, and activities could we provide to promote our graduate students’ learning, intellectual development, and achievement of their post-graduate school goals?”. Over a series of posts, I reviewed information and toolsContinue reading “Self-regulated Learning and Graduate Education: What Graduate Programs Should do Part 1”

Tools to Promote Grad Student Success: Presentation/Teaching/Media Skills

The final tool that graduate students need for success is presentation/teaching skills. This topic is often ignored in graduate programs – grad students are rarely taught how to teach before they are thrust in the classroom, and likewise, grad students are rarely taught how to make a good presentation, or practice presentations in front ofContinue reading “Tools to Promote Grad Student Success: Presentation/Teaching/Media Skills”

Tools to Promote Grad Student Success: Research Skills

I am still on the topic of self-regulated learning and graduate education. Today I want to discuss another tool that graduate students need for success: research skills. The art of conducting research has many components. First, students need to formulate research questions, preferably research questions that are going to be incremental, if not significant, additionsContinue reading “Tools to Promote Grad Student Success: Research Skills”

Information to Promote Grad Student Success

Last week I posed the question “What information, tools, tasks, and activities could we provide to promote our graduate students’ learning, intellectual development, and achievement of their post-graduate school goals?” So, let’s start with the first part of that question – what information could we provide to promote our graduate students’ learning, intellectual development, andContinue reading “Information to Promote Grad Student Success”

Designing an (Interdisciplinary) Graduate Seminar: The Crowd-Sourced Syllabus

Designing syllabi for graduate courses is a lot of work, particularly when they are seminars, and particularly when you are in an interdisciplinary program.  In an interdisciplinary program, you might want to teach a seminar on a topic, say intimate relationships, but may only know the research in the discipline (e.g. clinical psychology) you wereContinue reading “Designing an (Interdisciplinary) Graduate Seminar: The Crowd-Sourced Syllabus”

Don’t take my word for it: Crowdsourced Advice for Students Applying to Graduate School

I did a presentation a few years ago for prospective graduate students at the National Council on Family Relations annual conference. In preparation, I gathered advice for students applying to graduate school.  You can see the contributors below.  Do you agree with the advice? What is missing? Contributors: Elizabeth Adkins-Regan, Paul Amato, Mitchell Bartholomew, Alan Booth,Continue reading “Don’t take my word for it: Crowdsourced Advice for Students Applying to Graduate School”

Going it Alone: The Problem with Graduate Education in Disciplines that Value Solo Authorship

Working with students to get their publications ready for submission can take hours. I have recently been working with a superstar student from the Sociology department here at OSU. This student is bright, eager, motivated, and deliberate. We are working on a paper together, and the student is first author. We had our first formalContinue reading “Going it Alone: The Problem with Graduate Education in Disciplines that Value Solo Authorship”

Do Your Homework

My final year of graduate school, I went on the academic job market. I received four invitations for on-campus interviews [aka flyouts], and I attended each.  Unfortunately, I did not receive a job offer from any of these universities. The following year, the first year of my postdoc at Cornell University, I applied for onlyContinue reading “Do Your Homework”

Writing Group

As the mother of four (2 sons born in grad school, 2 sons born on the tenure track), people are always asking me “how do you do it?”  [Note, my husband never gets asked this question, which is a whole other blog post on gender attitudes.] My go to answer is always “high quality husband,Continue reading “Writing Group”

How to publish your paper rejected by Demography in the Journal of Family Psychology

One of the best things about being in an interdisciplinary department is that you can publish where you want – there is not a group of “top journals” that you have to push your papers in.  My colleagues in Sociology are trying to get papers in the American Sociological Review, American Journal of Sociology, andContinue reading “How to publish your paper rejected by Demography in the Journal of Family Psychology”

Welcome!

Welcome to my website where you can learn more about my work, and who I am working with, as well as check out my blog.  I am a family scholar and demographer. I do not identify with a single social science discipline. Rather, I used multiple disciplinary approaches in my research, from social psychology toContinue reading “Welcome!”

Me with my four sons the night we moved to Minnesota, May 2020

About Me

Hi, I’m Claire Kamp Dush, a professor at the Minnesota Population Center and in the Department of Sociology at the University of Minnesota. This is my blog, which was was started at my former institution, Ohio State, in 2014 and was formerly hosted at u.osu.edu/adventuresinhdfs.

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