Self-regulated Learning and Graduate Education: What Graduate Programs Should do Part 2

Well, it is time for my final post in my series on self-regulated learning and graduate education. This series resulted in the following posts: Motivation, Self-Regulated Learning, and Graduate Education Information to Promote Grad Student Success Tools to Promote Grad Student Success: Writing Skills Tools to Promote Grad Student Success: Research Skills Tools to PromoteContinue reading “Self-regulated Learning and Graduate Education: What Graduate Programs Should do Part 2”

Self-regulated Learning and Graduate Education: What Graduate Programs Should do Part 1

Today I want to wrap up my series on self-regulated learning and graduate education. I want to revisit my original question: “What information, tools, tasks, and activities could we provide to promote our graduate students’ learning, intellectual development, and achievement of their post-graduate school goals?”. Over a series of posts, I reviewed information and toolsContinue reading “Self-regulated Learning and Graduate Education: What Graduate Programs Should do Part 1”

Tools to Promote Grad Student Success: Presentation/Teaching/Media Skills

The final tool that graduate students need for success is presentation/teaching skills. This topic is often ignored in graduate programs – grad students are rarely taught how to teach before they are thrust in the classroom, and likewise, grad students are rarely taught how to make a good presentation, or practice presentations in front ofContinue reading “Tools to Promote Grad Student Success: Presentation/Teaching/Media Skills”

Tools to Promote Grad Student Success: Research Skills

I am still on the topic of self-regulated learning and graduate education. Today I want to discuss another tool that graduate students need for success: research skills. The art of conducting research has many components. First, students need to formulate research questions, preferably research questions that are going to be incremental, if not significant, additionsContinue reading “Tools to Promote Grad Student Success: Research Skills”

Tools to Promote Grad Student Success: Writing Skills

Well, apparently I took the summer off from blogging. I wasn’t necessarily planning that, but I was really busy with grant submissions, travel, paper revisions, etcetera. I had a great time at the International Association for Relationship Research conference in Australia in July, and I also visited and gave talks at the University of NewContinue reading “Tools to Promote Grad Student Success: Writing Skills”

Information to Promote Grad Student Success

Last week I posed the question “What information, tools, tasks, and activities could we provide to promote our graduate students’ learning, intellectual development, and achievement of their post-graduate school goals?” So, let’s start with the first part of that question – what information could we provide to promote our graduate students’ learning, intellectual development, andContinue reading “Information to Promote Grad Student Success”

Motivation, Self-Regulated Learning, and Graduate Education

I have been working on revising our grad handbook, and leading some revisions to our graduate curriculum this year in my role as grad studies chair. One process I looked at was the end of the year report. We have grad students submit annual evaluations. These annual evaluations were used to give students a ratingContinue reading “Motivation, Self-Regulated Learning, and Graduate Education”

Designing an (Interdisciplinary) Graduate Seminar: The Crowd-Sourced Syllabus

Designing syllabi for graduate courses is a lot of work, particularly when they are seminars, and particularly when you are in an interdisciplinary program.  In an interdisciplinary program, you might want to teach a seminar on a topic, say intimate relationships, but may only know the research in the discipline (e.g. clinical psychology) you wereContinue reading “Designing an (Interdisciplinary) Graduate Seminar: The Crowd-Sourced Syllabus”

Don’t take my word for it: Crowdsourced Advice for Students Applying to Graduate School

I did a presentation a few years ago for prospective graduate students at the National Council on Family Relations annual conference. In preparation, I gathered advice for students applying to graduate school.  You can see the contributors below.  Do you agree with the advice? What is missing? Contributors: Elizabeth Adkins-Regan, Paul Amato, Mitchell Bartholomew, Alan Booth,Continue reading “Don’t take my word for it: Crowdsourced Advice for Students Applying to Graduate School”

Should I go to graduate school?

As part of my job as grad studies chair, I have received several inquiries into our graduate program. Individuals emailing me are interested in graduate school for a variety of reasons: they love Ohio State and want to teach at OSU, they love teaching and want to teach college students, they love Human Development andContinue reading “Should I go to graduate school?”